Best weather apps for iPhone

The weather in the UK has been completely unpredictable lately, and with hot days in February and snow in April it's hard to know what to wear from one day to the next. We've rounded up our favourite free and paid weather apps for iPhone to help you figure out what the weather will be like for up to 15 days from now.

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  • Best weather apps accuweather AccuWeather
  • BBC Weather app BBC Weather
  • best weather apps met office Met Office Weather
  • Yahoo Weather Yahoo Weather
  • Meteoearth MeteoEarth
  • Haze app Haze
  • accuweather2 100565007 large Accuweather Platinum
  • darksky1 100565008 large Dark Sky
  • More stories
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AccuWeather

With a long-range, 15-day forecast and useful at-a-glance temperature graphs, Accuweather is a comprehensive weather app. We also like the ‘RealFeel’ temperatures and that you can get a personal forecast for outdoor sports, DIY and other activities.

You get a clear summary of what the weather is like right now, with an indication of any change coming up. Scroll down to see what to expect for the rest of the day, the current levels of humidity, wind speed, cloud cover, presure, and so on.

The Hourly Forecast is there for those of you who want to know when the best time is to nip out to the shops. Scroll alomg to see how the weather will progress over the next few days.

If you want to go a little further ahead in time, the Daily Forecast runs to 15 days and for each of those days there will be the temperature high and low, a one sentence description of the weather that day, and your percentage chance of precipitation. 

There's even more information below that including the sun and moon phases and a map of your location, which if you click on it will take you to a moving weather map that will show how the weather will develop across the whole of the country.

You can set up your favourite locations by town name, or by postcode. The app will show the weather at your current location as long as you allow it to access Location Services.

Read next: Best iPad & iPhone apps

Next »

Next Prev Best weather apps accuweather

With a long-range, 15-day forecast and useful at-a-glance temperature graphs, Accuweather is a comprehensive weather app. We also like the ‘RealFeel’ temperatures and that you can get a personal forecast for outdoor sports, DIY and other activities.

You get a clear summary of what the weather is like right now, with an indication of any change coming up. Scroll down to see what to expect for the rest of the day, the current levels of humidity, wind speed, cloud cover, presure, and so on.

The Hourly Forecast is there for those of you who want to know when the best time is to nip out to the shops. Scroll alomg to see how the weather will progress over the next few days.

If you want to go a little further ahead in time, the Daily Forecast runs to 15 days and for each of those days there will be the temperature high and low, a one sentence description of the weather that day, and your percentage chance of precipitation. 

There's even more information below that including the sun and moon phases and a map of your location, which if you click on it will take you to a moving weather map that will show how the weather will develop across the whole of the country.

You can set up your favourite locations by town name, or by postcode. The app will show the weather at your current location as long as you allow it to access Location Services.

Read next: Best iPad & iPhone apps

 

BBC Weather

Since we last took a look at it, the BBC Weather app has gained a polution read out, along with its UV and Pollen counts. Not much else has changed other than a few layout tweaks.

You'll see the weather right now (cloud cover in our case) along with today's high and low. 

There's a ten day forecast. Tap on each day to see the predominant weather for that day, along with the high and low, sun rise/set and wind speed and direction.

 

Met Office Weather

Predicting the weather is a bit of a national joke so why not go for the app from the UK’s national meteorological service? The new Met Office Weather app is free, and provides 7-day forecasts for locations around the world including thousands in the UK.

The new, redesigned Met Office app includes a daily forecast, hourly fourecasts for the next two days and three-hourly forecasts for seven days, weather warnings, a rainfall map, a 'feels like' temperature to help you figure out what to wear and lots more.

 

Yahoo Weather

The Yahoo Weather app was actually the winner of an Apple Design Award 2013 and it's obvious why, the backdrop is a beautiful photograph of your location or the weather right now taken from Flickr.

Scroll down on the screen to see an hourly forecast, and the option of a five day forecast or a 10 day forecast.

Even further down the page you can see more detail about the current weather, including the 'feels like' temperature, humidity, visibility and UV. There is also a Today and a Tonight forecast.

Below that is the Precipitation levels expected over the next day or so, split up according to Evening, Night, Overnight, and Early Morn.

Then there is Wind & Pressure and Sun and Moon phases.

 

MeteoEarth

If you like your weather apps spectacular, MeteoEarth is the most spectacular we've seen.

Adapted from a broadcast tool used by TV presenters, it displays a map or globe with your choice of precipitation, wind, temperature and so on superimposed over the top; you can then swipe along a timeline to see how things will change in the next few days, or set it to run by itself.

It's quite stunning, but possibly overkill if you just want to see if it's going to rain today. Read our full MeteoEarth review here.

 

Haze

If you're looking for something that delivers accurate weather information but is also appealing to the eyes and ears, then Haze could be a good choice.

It uses animations and an audio-visual interface to present weather information including a five day forecast, sunshine hours, UV, cloud coverage, high and low temperatures and wind information.

It also provides precipitation information, humidity levels and atmospheric pressure data.

 

AccuWeather Platinum

In addition to the free, ad-supported Accuweather app we've mentioned, there's a £3.99 upgrade to AccuWeather Platinum.

There's a ton of information crammed into the app's modular interface, but none of it gets in the way of the current temperature and conditions, clearly displayed against an animated representation of what's going on outside your window. Any warnings or advisories are positioned at the top of the screen, but scroll a bit down and you'll find a wealth of customizable weather stats, from commonplace figures for visibility, pressure and dew point to more unique features like hourly precipitation forecasts to the phase of the moon. Clicking on most segments expands them to show a greater level of information, including a very useful plain language description of the forecast.

But what really sets Accuweather Platinum apart is its MinuteCast. Accessible on the main screen, it offers a forensic look at the next two hours, as it literally lets you know the exact moment you'll need an umbrella on your 30-minute walk. Gesture-based and extremely accurate, it blows away any other app we've used for live tracking.

 

Dark Sky

Want to know when it is going to rain? Dark Sky is the only app we’ve used that puts all of its efforts specifically into answering that exact question. It’s so good at what it does, we rarely need to open it anymore - notifications dutifully keep us apprised of when the wet stuff is on its way.

Instead of a map, Dark Sky lets you literally scan the globe by swiping and pinching to find the most intense weather spots. Always visible by way of a transparent layer just beneath the screen, it puts a whole new spin on weather apps (literally) by turning the radar into the forecast; a 12-day span lets you follow storms and watch as they develop and dissipate, giving a greater understanding to just how hard it is to predict the weather.

And while most other weather apps focuses on a few locales of your choosing, Dark Sky encourages you to explore parts of the world you’ll probably never visit. If there’s no precipitation near you, the app will suggest an area where you’re sure to find some, giving you an excuse to play with its stunning interface.

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