The best Mac mouse

Which is the best mouse for a Mac? We help you choose the best mouse for an Apple Mac as we check out the 11 best mouse options for a Mac user.

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  • best mouse for mac magic mouse 2 Magic Mouse 2
  • best mouse for mac magic mouse Magic Mouse 1
  • best mouse for mac trackpad Magic Trackpad 2
  • best mouse for mac logitech g502 Logitech G502
  • best mouse for mac evoluent Evoluent Vertical Mouse
  • best mouse for mac mx master Logitech MX Master
  • best mouse for mac kensington Kensington SlimBlade Trackball
  • best mouse for mac logitech ultrathin touch Logitech Ultrathin Touch Mouse T630
  • best mouse for mac microsoft comfort Microsoft Comfort Mouse 4500
  • best mouse for mac designer mouse Microsoft Designer Bluetooth Mouse
  • best mouse for mac razer Razer Ouroboros
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Apple Magic Mouse 2

  • RRP: £79, US$79
  • Buy from Apple

Buy one of Apple's new iMacs and you'll be given the option of the updated Magic Mouse 2, the latest take on Apple's wireless mouse design.

It's a design that's divided opinion: many find that flat, sleek, symmetrical body shape too insubstantial to be comfortable in the hand, and this can in turn make activating its gestures tricky. But plenty of others enjoy the Magic Mice, and peripherals are after all a thoroughly personal matter. Try it before you buy it, we'd say.

If you're interested and want to find out more about the Magic Mouse 2, read our full review here. Otherwise, continue reading for plenty of other great options.

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Next Prev best mouse for mac magic mouse 2

Buy one of Apple's new iMacs and you'll be given the option of the updated Magic Mouse 2, the latest take on Apple's wireless mouse design.

It's a design that's divided opinion: many find that flat, sleek, symmetrical body shape too insubstantial to be comfortable in the hand, and this can in turn make activating its gestures tricky. But plenty of others enjoy the Magic Mice, and peripherals are after all a thoroughly personal matter. Try it before you buy it, we'd say.

If you're interested and want to find out more about the Magic Mouse 2, read our full review here. Otherwise, continue reading for plenty of other great options.

 

Apple Magic Mouse

  • RRP: £60

Apple has stopped selling the original Magic Mouse from 2009 but we you can still pick one up elsewhere, and it remains a solid option if you're looking for a Bluetooth wireless mouse for your Mac or MacBook.

It looks great for a start, with a sleek, contoured design that is also very comfortable in your hand. The entire top surface of the mouse acts as one large button, but you can change the way that it works by using the options in System Preferences. It acts as a virutal scroll wheel too. Clever.

The Magic Mouse also eats batteries a bit faster than we'd like - in a few weeks rather than months - so it's worth investing in a set of rechargeable batteries, or perhaps looking at rivals that provide longer battery life. Or you could of course spend the extra cash and get the previously mentioned updated Magic Mouse 2, which has a rechargeable battery.

 

Apple Magic Trackpad 2

  • RRP: £109

The second in Apple's raft of 'Magic' branded peripherals, the Magic Trackpad 2 brings Force Touch to desktop Macs for the first time. It comes at a cost, mind you.

The design is beautiful, with the whisper-smooth white matt top surface a particular highlight, and the ability to use harder Force Clicks to activate application-specific special commands, while a little confusing at first, is lots of fun and occasionally genuinely useful. This will only get more useful as more software companies develop for it.

Like the Magic Mouse 2, the trackpad has a rechargeable battery that's charged via a (bundled) Lightning cable, and pairs with a Mac automatically the instant you plug it in. Assuming the Mac is running El Capitan, that is.

For more, read our Magic Trackpad 2 review.

 

Logitech G502 Proteus Core Mouse

The Logitech G502 offers a few key features that both media users and gamers can relish, and it's regarded as one of the most accurate and well respected mouse sensors in the market. Perfect for gamers.

Logitech has designed mac compatible software to go alongside the G502, too, so you'll be able to custom tune your Proteus Core to your liking. Every button is customisable on the mouse and with up to three separate profiles to setup, the possibilities are endless.

 

Evoluent VerticalMouse

  • RRP: £90

Evoluent's Vertical Mouse is designed specifically to avoid RSI. It works just like an ordinary mouse, but it puts the buttons and scroll wheel on the side of the device, rather than on the top surface. This allows you to rest your arm and wrist on the desk in a more natural position, and to just apply slight pressure with your fingers in order to press the buttons.

It's a little expensive, but a very worthwhile investment for anyone that finds conventional mice uncomfortable to use, and you can read more about it on the Evoluent web site.

 

Logitech MX Master Wireless Mouse

  • RRP: £79.99, US$79.99

The Logitech MX Master is a contender for the most comfortable and enjoyable computer mouse we’ve ever used. It's accurate, brilliantly designed and makes scrolling a joy.

While other products in our roundup rely on cables to connect, the Logitech MX Master is wireless, offering two methods of connectivity to connect to your computer: Bluetooth or the plug-in Unifying Reciever bundled with the mouse.  The first is fairly standard, using Smart Bluetooth technology to communicate with your computer.

According to Logitech, it lasts around 40 days on a full battery charge and only requires 4 minutes of charging to get a single day worth of use out of it. It has a battery indicator on the side so you’ll never be caught out with a dead battery, and charges using Micro-USB.

 

Kensington SlimBlade Trackball

  • RRP: £110

Very few companies still make trackballs, but we really enjoy using them because you don't need to grip it and move it around your desk, as you do with a conventional mouse. That means that the trackball takes up a lot less space on your desk and puts less strain on your arm and wrist. They're also precise and accurate, so you get the precision of a mouse combined with the space-saving convenience of a trackpad.

Kensington is one of the few companies that still make trackballs, and its entire range is Mac-compatible. We like Kensington’s top-of-the-range SlimBlade. It’s got four chunky buttons that are comfortable and easy to use, and which can also be programmed to perform different tasks. That big, shiny ball serves a purpose too, as you can twist it to switch the trackball into different modes. There’s a Media mode that provides controls for playing music or zooming in on photos, and a Navigation mode for scrolling through documents and web pages. Our only complaint is that its price tag is a bit steep for a device that uses a straightforward USB cable connection.

 

Logitech Ultrathin Bluetooth Mouse

  • RRP: £69.99

Logitech’s Ultrathin Touch Mouse T630 for Mac is a neatly designed little device that combines elements of both a conventional mouse and a multi-touch trackpad.

It lives up to its name too, with a slim, wedge-shaped design that measures just 0.7 inches (18mm) at the thickest, front edge of the mouse.

The brushed metal design makes a good match for most Mac models and, like Apple’s Magic Mouse, the entire top panel of the T630 acts as a mouse button, but it’s also touch-sensitive so that you can use it like a trackpad as well. It uses Bluetooth for wireless connectivity, and scores extra brownie points for including its own rechargeable battery, so you don’t have to spend any money on batteries yourself.

 

Microsoft Comfort Mouse 4500

Wireless technology is all well and good, but it makes your mouse more expensive to buy, and also means that you have to buy replacement batteries every few months as well. An old-fashioned wired mouse is perfectly good for most Macs - although possibly not for the shiny new MacBook that just has that one single USB-C port to play with.

If you want to buy a decent, basic mouse that doesn’t cost too much then the Microsoft Comfort Mouse 4500 is a good choice. It has a nice contoured shape that is indeed comfortable to hold, along with rubber panels along the sides that help to give you a good grip. It uses a standard USB cable to connect to your Mac, but it’s got five buttons that you can program to perform different tasks, along with a scrollwheel.

 

Microsoft Designer Bluetooth Mouse

Microsoft's keyboards and mice may not look as pretty as Apple's devices, but they’re really comfortable and hard-wearing.

The Designer Bluetooth Mouse is a good option if you want a Bluetooth wireless mouse that costs less than Apple’s Magic Mouse. It also goes a bit easier on batteries than the Magic Mouse, as Microsoft says that it should last for about six months with just two little AAA batteries.

It’s a three-button mouse, with the middle scroll wheel acting as the third button, and you can program the buttons for left- or right-handed use. Its Bluetrack technology allows the mouse to work on virtually any type of surface – even including your trouser-leg or skirt, too.

 

Razer Ouroboros Elite Ambidextrous Wireless Gaming Mouse

  • RRP: £139.99

The Ouroboros from Razer isn't cheap, and it looks more like a Klingon battle cruiser than a mouse, but it’s one of the best mice for Mac gamers. [Read: Best games for Mac]

It looks clunky as hell, and certainly feels a bit hefty the first time you pick it up, but that's because it's really sturdy and built to take a beating during long gaming sessions. It’s also highly adjustable, allowing you to move the top panel of the mouse to accommodate different types of grip - maybe a strong grip for fast-moving action games or a lighter 'fingertip' grip for strategy games where you need to reach lots of different control buttons quickly. You can even adjust the side panels on the mouse to support your fingers too.

It's highly precise, and can be calibrated for maximum sensitivity on specific surfaces, and it even has its own computer processor inside to ensure fast responses for the latest action games. There are no less than programmable 11 buttons scattered around the surface of the mouse, and you can also change the way the buttons work to accommodate both left- and right-handed use.

You can use the Ouroboros as either a wireless or wired mouse, but its heavy-duty hardware can use up the single AA battery in only 12 hours, so if you’re gaming on a desktop Mac at home then you’re better off using the USB cable supplied with the mouse for a straightforward wired connection.

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