Tutorial: Add images and titles to iMovie

Jazz up your video with still photos and theme-specific titles

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  • Annotated Screenshot 1 Intro
  • Step 01 Step 1: Accessing your photos
  • Step 02 Step 2: Add a photo
  • Step 03 Step 3: Pan and zoom
  • Step 04 Step 4: Titles
  • Step 05 Step 5: Location
  • Step 06 Step 6: Title style
  • More stories
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Intro

Shooting videos and making movies can be great fun, but it’s also a time-consuming affair and – if you think about it – a relatively new concept. Taking photos is something that’s been around for much longer, and as a consequence, many more people are comfortable with the notion of snapping a few shots of people or locations. However, if you’ve taken some still images, you can use them as part of your short film, or even create a wonderful slideshow with the help of iMovie for iPad.

In this tutorial, we’ll explain how you can preview your images, add them to your project, and even set up a pan and zoom effect so the camera moves across the photo over time. Another useful feature is the ability to add titles (to both photos and video clips), so we’ll take this opportunity to check out the various titling options available to you.

Vital Info

Device: iPad
Difficulty: Beginner
Time required: 20 mins

What you need: 

iMovie (£2.99) 
iOS 5.1 or later

Next »

Next Prev Annotated Screenshot 1

Shooting videos and making movies can be great fun, but it’s also a time-consuming affair and – if you think about it – a relatively new concept. Taking photos is something that’s been around for much longer, and as a consequence, many more people are comfortable with the notion of snapping a few shots of people or locations. However, if you’ve taken some still images, you can use them as part of your short film, or even create a wonderful slideshow with the help of iMovie for iPad.

In this tutorial, we’ll explain how you can preview your images, add them to your project, and even set up a pan and zoom effect so the camera moves across the photo over time. Another useful feature is the ability to add titles (to both photos and video clips), so we’ll take this opportunity to check out the various titling options available to you.

Vital Info

Device: iPad
Difficulty: Beginner
Time required: 20 mins

What you need: 

iMovie (£2.99) 
iOS 5.1 or later

 

Step 2 of 7: Step 1: Accessing your photos

Your iMovie library is divided into three sections: video clips, photos and music. Tap on the Photos button to access all the still images stored on your iPad. There’s a handy search field at the top, or you can browse through them all on your own.

 

Step 3 of 7: Step 2: Add a photo

To see your photo in the Preview area, tap and hold it. To add it to your project, make sure your playhead is over the correct location and tap on your image. By default, it will be displayed for 4.2 seconds. You can change this by dragging the yellow handles in your project’s timeline.

 

Step 4 of 7: Step 3: Pan and zoom

Drag the playhead over your photo to see the automatic panning. To adjust the pan, tap on the image to select it. In the Preview section, hit Start. Resize and reposition the image. Tap End and repeat the procedure, this time setting what to focus on at the end of the animation.

 

Step 5 of 7: Step 4: Titles

To give your film a more professional look, you can include opening and closing titles. These have to be added over an existing clip. To access them, double-tap on your chosen clip (photo or video). This opens up the settings window. Two options are available: Title Style and Location.

 

Step 6 of 7: Step 5: Location

Shots taken with your iPad or iPhone record your location, and this information will appear automatically. You can overwrite the default name by tapping on it. To change the location itself, tap on Other, start typing and select a site from a list of available options.

 

Step 7 of 7: Step 6: Title style

Now tap Title Style. Your choices are simple: you can have Opening or Ending titles, or a Middle title which appears at the bottom of the screen. Select one. To edit the text, tap on the sample in the Preview section. (If you change the theme, your text will be preserved.)

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