36 brilliant iOS 9 tips

iOS 9.3, which made its debut in March 2016, brings some fantastic new features including Night Shift mode and password protected Notes to go along with the lower-power mode and Transit directions in Maps introduced with iOS 9. Our guide to iOS 9's 36 most interesting and useful new functions will help you master the new OS, and shows some of the ways iOS 9 will change the way you experience your iPad or iPhone

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  • Proactive 1
  • Night Shift mode 2
  • Password protected Notes 3
  • Shortcut to Settings 4
  • Multi-user login 5
  • Multitasking I 6
  • Multitasking II 7
  • Picture in Picture 8
  • Smaller install 9
  • 6-digit passcode 10
  • Keyboard cursor 11
  • Keyboard design 12
  • Shortcut bar 13
  • Notes I 14
  • Notes II 15
  • Notes III 16
  • Maps: Public transport 17
  • Power-saving mode 18
  • Power-saving II 19
  • News 20
  • Wallet 21
  • Back button 22
  • Android Migration 23
  • iCloud Drive 24
  • Flash 25
  • Improved Photos 26
  • Photos folders 27
  • Bigger folders 28
  • Polite Siri 29
  • Smarter Siri 30
  • Mail 31
  • Find My apps 32
  • Wi-Fi Assist 33
  • Sexual health 34
  • Wireless CarPlay 35
  • Music quality 36
  • More stories
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Tip 1 of 36: Proactive - Teach iOS your routine

iOS 9 has been with us for a year, and we're still enjoying many of its new additions, including those added in the fairly hefty iOS 9.3 update. In this slideshow we're going to walk you through some of our favourites, and help you to master the new features. We'll start with a little something we call 'Proactive'.

If you're looking for iOS 10 tips, you've come to the wrong place - head here instead: Top tips for iOS 10

Read next: iOS 9 review | iOS 9 vs iOS 8 | iOS 9 release date and new features | Can my iPad/iPhone get iOS 9? | How to update to iOS 9  | Advanced iOS 9 tips

Yes, it's pretty much copied from Android's Google Now*. But Proactive remains one of the more pleasing new features in iOS 9, and the one with the greatest potential to be gently life-altering.

Proactive (that's what we're calling it; it appears to be Apple's codename rather than an official branding) tries to stay one step ahead, always doing its best to work out what you'll want to do next and then offer a shortcut to that behaviour.

Ring your mum at a certain time each week? iOS will start placing her contact icon in your Search screen when the appointed hour approaches, so you can make the call with a single swipe (left from the first Home screen/pane, or downwards from any Home screen) and tap. Like to hit the tunes at the gym? You'll get a Now Playing in the lock screen at the usual time, or when you plug in the headphones.

How do you get these conveniences? Just use iOS as much as you can: it'll soon learn. And look out for the shortcuts. Remember to browse the Search screen to see how much iOS has picked up about your habits.

If you want to read more on the subject of Apple's new Proactive personal assistant, take a look at iOS 9 makes Siri more 'proactive' and adds video search and Watch out Google Now, Siri may get 'Proactive' in iOS 9. Otherwise, turn to the next slide for more tips as we explore the new features of iOS 9.

* That said, we know which company we'd be happier to have monitoring our app usage and the people we email and call in certain locations and at particular times of day.

Next Tip »

Next Prev slideshow image

iOS 9 has been with us for a year, and we're still enjoying many of its new additions, including those added in the fairly hefty iOS 9.3 update. In this slideshow we're going to walk you through some of our favourites, and help you to master the new features. We'll start with a little something we call 'Proactive'.

If you're looking for iOS 10 tips, you've come to the wrong place - head here instead: Top tips for iOS 10

Read next: iOS 9 review | iOS 9 vs iOS 8 | iOS 9 release date and new features | Can my iPad/iPhone get iOS 9? | How to update to iOS 9  | Advanced iOS 9 tips

Yes, it's pretty much copied from Android's Google Now*. But Proactive remains one of the more pleasing new features in iOS 9, and the one with the greatest potential to be gently life-altering.

Proactive (that's what we're calling it; it appears to be Apple's codename rather than an official branding) tries to stay one step ahead, always doing its best to work out what you'll want to do next and then offer a shortcut to that behaviour.

Ring your mum at a certain time each week? iOS will start placing her contact icon in your Search screen when the appointed hour approaches, so you can make the call with a single swipe (left from the first Home screen/pane, or downwards from any Home screen) and tap. Like to hit the tunes at the gym? You'll get a Now Playing in the lock screen at the usual time, or when you plug in the headphones.

How do you get these conveniences? Just use iOS as much as you can: it'll soon learn. And look out for the shortcuts. Remember to browse the Search screen to see how much iOS has picked up about your habits.

If you want to read more on the subject of Apple's new Proactive personal assistant, take a look at iOS 9 makes Siri more 'proactive' and adds video search and Watch out Google Now, Siri may get 'Proactive' in iOS 9. Otherwise, turn to the next slide for more tips as we explore the new features of iOS 9.

* That said, we know which company we'd be happier to have monitoring our app usage and the people we email and call in certain locations and at particular times of day.

 

Step 2 of 36: Night Shift mode - Helps you sleep at night

Night Shift mode is hands down our favourite feature of iOS 9.3, although (if you have the beta) it’s fairly easy to miss. Studies have shown that exposure to blue light (emitted from displays) can affect your circadian rhythms and thus make it harder to fall asleep at night. As Macworld UK staff, you can imagine that we’ve been suffering from this issue for quite some time, and we can honestly say that Apple’s Night Shift mode has dramatically improved the amount of time it takes for us to fall asleep at night.

The idea behind Night Shift mode is to use your iOS device’s clock and geolocation to determine the sunset in your location, then automatically adjust the colours of the display to the warmer end of the spectrum which Apple claims is “easier on your eyes”. The mode can be accessed either via the Settings app or from the Control Center, and can be toggled on or off with a single tap.  

 

Step 3 of 36: Notes - password protect your notes

Let’s admit it – we all use the Notes app to store information that we sometimes wouldn’t appreciate anybody else getting their hands on. This usually includes Wi-Fi passwords, website logins and even financial information – sensitive information that up until now anybody that can unlock your iPhone/iPad can have access to.

iOS 9.3 looks to combat this issue by offering users the ability to protect notes with sensitive information either by using a password or Touch ID. Simply tap the share icon within the note you want to protect, tap ‘Lock Note’ and input your desired password. Note that this only has to be done once and all future notes will be protected using the same password. To lock the note, simply tap the padlock icon – it’s as simple as that.  

 

Step 4 of 36: 3D Touch shortcuts for Settings app

This tip is only for iPhone 6s and 6s Plus users as it requires 3D Touch, so we apologise to those using older devices, but this is a feature we’ve been waiting for. It’s fairly simple – in iOS 9.3, simply force press the Settings icon on the home screen and you’ll be greeted with new shortcuts to Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and Battery settings. iOS users have been asking for a shortcut to Wi-Fi and Bluetooth settings for quite some time, and it’s nice to see Apple listening to its fan base.

 

Step 5 of 36: iOS for Education - Multi-user login

The ability to create multi-user logins on your iPad has been a requested feature for as long as we can remember, enabling friends and family to have a personal experience on a shared iPad. It seems as if Apple has finally listened and integrated the feature in iOS 9.3, although there is a catch - sadly it’s limited to Apple’s ‘iOS in Education’ initiative, and won’t be available for users at home.

The feature allows school administrators to create multiple user accounts for students and it’s as simple as tapping on the student’s photo and logging in with either a four-digit pin or via Touch ID. It also brings benefits like Screen View, a feature that enables teachers to access a live feed of any students iPad to check their work – if they’re distracted, the teacher can lock the iPad to open only a specific app or website to stop students accessing any other content.

 

Step 6 of 36: Multitasking - Have two apps onscreen at once

This one is just for the iPad - and the more advanced part of it is just for the iPad Air 2, at least for the time being. (Mind you, it would suit the iPad Pro down to the ground, so maybe there's more to that rumour than we thought…) But it's such a long-awaited and cool-looking feature that those who can get it are in for a treat.

The simple form of multitasking on the iPad - and this one is for all the iPads that are compatible with iOS 9, which is to say the iPad 2 and later; see Which iPads and iPhones will be able to run iOS 9? - involves opening any app and then swiping inwards from the righthand side of the screen. You'll see a slim sidebar where you can pick another app, and have it open in that part of the screen while the first app remains visible in the rest.

Handy for various work scenarios: viewing an email and copy-and-pasting important elements into a Notes document open in the main window, for example, or viewing a journey in Maps while noting down directions.

 

Step 7 of 36: Multitasking part II - Have two tasks on the go at once

If you've got an iPad Air 2, you can take iOS 9's multitasking chops to the next level, by having two apps running side by side and interacting with them both at the same time. As Apple puts it, "Work on a sketch with the reference photo beside it. Or write a paper while copying citations from a book in iBooks."

This function is called Split View. You can also change the screen space devoted to each of the two apps, although the default appears to be 50/50.

Again, we also expect this to work on the next generation of full-size iPads, and adds fuel to the iPad Pro rumour.

 

Step 8 of 36: Multitasking part III - Picture in Picture

The third aspect of multitasking in iOS 9 is called Picture in Picture, and lets you watch video clips and television shows while working in other apps. On the Mac this sort of thing is easy: just run a video and place it in the corner while you work. On the iPad it's not been possible - until now.

Apple's new Picture in Picture mode moves the video into the bottom corner of the screen while you carry on using another app. Whenever you're watching a video, you just have to press the Home button to tell iOS 9 to shrink the video screen down to a corner of your display. You can then open another app normally, and the video will keep playing in its little window.

The video you're watching can be live FaceTime, and third-party video apps can use Apple's SDK to implement PIP mode in their app. We hope the BBC implements it for iPlayer, and Google does likewise for YouTube.

 

Step 9 of 36: Lightweight OS: a smaller install file

Apple appears to be learning from previous mistakes.

A major problem with iOS 8, which caused delays for many users' update process and put off others from updating at all, was the size of the installation file. With 4.58GB of space taken for the update, a lot of people - particularly those with 16GB devices - found themselves effectively excluded from iOS 8.

(In fact there was a simple way around this problem - installing iOS 8 via iTunes. But not everyone knew about this.)

This time around, iOS will be much more of a lightweight install. iOS 9 'streams' updates to your device - this is part of a general slimming-down effort that Apple calls App Thinning - reducing the amount of space needed for the initial upload; it will ask you for only 1.3GB of space.

And that's not all. If you still haven't got enough space to install iOS 9 or any later updates, a popup will assist you. It will ask you to temporarily delete some apps in order to make room for the update, and then automatically reinstall them after the update.

Read next: 17 ways to save space on your iPhone

 

Step 10 of 36: 6-digit passcode

Apple is gently encouraging better security practices among its users.

Instead of the 4-digit passcodes we've been used to in the past, iOS 9 will ask you to create a 6-digit passcode to increase your security.

You can still opt for the classic passcode (we explain how to go back to 4 digits here: How to change an iPhone or iPad passcode from six digits back to four digits in iOS 9) but Apple suggests you use the new format: it opens up one million possible combinations instead of 10,000.

Read more: How to set up the best privacy settings in iOS 8 | What security apps do you need for iPad & iPhone?

 

Step 11 of 36: Keyboard cursor

Let's look at the system keyboard next: it's not glamorous, but it underpins almost everything you do on an iOS device.

First up, and most ambitiously, Apple has given iOS 9's system keyboard the ability to move around a document with a virtual cursor - on iPads, anyway. Simply tap and hold anywhere on the screen with two fingers at once, and the keys will all grey out. From now on, moving the two fingers will move the virtual cursor, automatically selecting any text between the original point where you started and the new place you've moved the cursor to.

Read next: Best keyboard apps for iOS 8

 

Step 12 of 36: Keyboard design and shift key

We're back in the realm of mundanity now, but this is an important enhancement. The Shift key in iOS used to be deeply ambiguous, switching colour between the white of the normal keys (off) and the dull grey of the special keys (on) without most people being able to remember which was which.

Rather than adding colour to the On state, as some expected Apple to do, they've made the symbols depicted on all the keys change from upper to lower case so that you know exactly what's going on.

However, it seems that Apple can’t win with some users now complaining about the use of a lower case keyboard, stating that it looks ‘ugly’ and the capitalised keyboard was just fine. Instead of having to wait another year for Apple to address the issue, the company has instead included a toggle for those that want to disable the lower case keyboard.

To re-enable the upper case keyboard, simply head to Settings > General > Accessibility > Keyboard and switch off ‘Show Lowercase Keys’.

 

Step 13 of 36: Shortcut bar

The last stop on our tour of the iOS 9 keyboard concerns those awesome new icons that sit either side of the QuickType suggestion bar. These are shortcuts for common commands.

Depending on the app you're in, the shortcuts will vary, but you'll always get Cut (scissors), Copy (a square and dotted square) and Paste (a solid square and clipboard). If space is tight, however (such as in Notes), these three may be hidden together under a single icon: the scissors. Tap it to reveal the full palette of options.

Notes adds shortcuts for formatting options (a capital A and a lower-case a), to-do lists (a tick in a circle) and sketches (a squiggle), both of which we'll discuss in later slides.

Other apps may offer a camera icon for adding pictures and videos; a paperclip for adding attachments; bold/italic/underlined letters for more formatting options; and so on. As you can see, most are pretty self-explanatory. Experiment if you see one you don't recognise: there's no 'delete document with no confirmation' icon, as far as we're aware.

 

Step 14 of 36: Notes part I - Add sketches

Let's return, then, to the neglected Notes app, which in iOS 9 has had a few new features added as part of a general revamp.

Most appealingly (at least to us) is its new support for quick line sketches. Tap that squiggle icon we mentioned in the last slide, and Notes will open a new window where you'll compose the sketch you wish to add to your document. Colours are selected along the bottom, as are pens and pencils of varying weight and texture (in fact, there are really only three options - from left to right: a straightforward thin pen line, a highlighter pen that will let pen lines show through it, and a thin, textured pencil). You can also remove lines with the rubber.

Most fun of all - if digital stationery can ever be so described - is the ruler. Tap it once and it appears on the sketch; tap it again and it disappears. This can be moved around with a single finger, or rotated with two. And at any moment you can sketch along the edge of it with whichever pen/pencil tool you had previously selected (there's no need to 'deselect' the ruler and pick a pen).

There's an Undo andRedo at the top of the window; tap Done to save the sketch in your document. (You can also share or save the sketch on its own - use the sharing icon at the top right.) If you decide you want to modify the sketch after this point, tap it once in your document and the sketch-editing window will open again. Tap Done to return to your document, complete with updated sketch.

Last tip - you can easily see which of your Notes have sketches attached, because a thumbnail of the sketch will appear to the left of the document's entry in the list of files. If you've included two or more sketches, only the first will be shown.

Read next: How to use the Notes app on the iPhone and iPad

 

Step 15 of 36: Notes part II - Add to-do lists

This one won't take as long. But it can also be useful. Having taken on board the fact that many iOS users turn to Notes for shopping lists and other forms of the to-do list, Apple has made it easy to add tick boxes next to items on a list, so that you can make a note when each one is accomplished without having to delete it from the list entirely. (This can be handy for repeat lists that need to be performed every day, for instance, or a regular shopping list that is bought in whole or part on a semi-regular basis.)

Highlight your list, using the traditional method or the virtual cursor we mentioned above, and tap the tick-in-a-circle icon. They will immediately turn into tickable action points. Tap the same icon again to revert to a normal list.

You can also hit return to start a new line, and tap the icon once to create a single tick box that you can then write a caption for, if you'd prefer to do things that way round.

 

Step 16 of 36: Notes part III - Formatting

Notes now has more sophisticated formatting options. These are now accessed via the capital A/lower-case A icon, instead of from the options bar that appears when select text.

Notes has seven text styles (as well as the previously available bold, italic and underlined styles), but three of these are available as a starting default: Title, Heading or Body. You can decide which one Notes defaults to when you start typing in a new document by going to Settings, Notes, New Notes Start With. If you select Title or Heading, Notes will default back to the Body style for the second and subsequent paragraphs.

 

Step 17 of 36: Public-transport directions in Maps

If you're planning a journey and don't own a car, Apple Maps was no help at all in iOS 8, lagging years behind its Google counterpart. But iOS 9 adds public-transport directions at last.

Search for a location, then tap Directions at the top left to bring up that section. Select the Transport tab.

Choose the route you wish to take from the options given, then tap Start at the foot of the page. Maps will guide you through your journey. (We've not tested this properly yet, so we're not sure if Maps will be clever enough to cache the journey so you don't lose directions when you go underground and lose signal.)

Alternatively, you can jump to directions from the pin that appears when you run the original search. Note that the pin has a time and a walking icon next to it; tap this and you'll open walking directions. Tap the Transport tab to revert to public-transport directions instead.

Bear in mind that, as far as the UK goes, public-transport directions will be limited to London. The list of supported cities is a bit surreal: six US cities, Toronto and some nearby cities in Canada, London, Berlin, Mexico City, and then more than 300 locations in China. A clue there to Apple's priorities.

For more on the updated Maps app, see Apple Maps in iOS 9 adds public transit, local business search. And to see how Apple Maps in iOS 9 compares to Google Maps, take a look at Apple Maps vs Google Maps comparison review.

 

Step 18 of 36: Power-saving mode

Here's a small but potentially huge change that we've been demanding for years: a system-wide battery-saving mode.

Whenever your iPhone (and as far as we can tell it only works on iPhone, so far at any rate; a later beta may add iPad support) drops below 20 percent power, a message will pop up to warn you of this fact and to offer Low Power Mode. Tap this to reduce animations throughout the system, decrease the time before the screen darkens, and generally make every effort to eke out your battery life for a little longer.

You can activate Low Power Mode at other times: look for the option in the new Battery section of Settings. (It's in the same grouping as the General section, and has a green icon.)

You can tell that Low Power Mode is in effect, by the way, by looking at the battery indicator at the top of the screen: whereas this is ordinarily green when above 20 percent and red below, it will be orange if in Low Power Mode.

Read next: 33 tips to help boost iPhone battery life

 

Step 19 of 36: Power-saving part II - Facedown detection

Apart from Low Power Mode, there's one more feature that'll help extend your battery life. 

Apple has been quite vague about how it manages to extend your battery life in iOS 9, but the company has mentioned something called facedown detection. Though unconfirmed, the idea is that the iPhone uses its motion sensors to detect its orientation and determine when it's facedown on the table.

Once its detected that it's face down, it'll prevent the screen from turning on whenever you recieve a notification to help save battery life. It'll still vibrate to alert you of the notification, and if the iPhone is picked up within seconds of the notification delivery, the display will automatically turn on. It's worth noting that it's only supported on the iPhone 5s upwards, so older device owners won't benefit from this extra feature. 

So, to help save battery life on your iPhone, simply leave it face down on your table when not in use! 

 

Step 20 of 36: Apple News - bringing the world's information to you

Apple has been trying to bring better reading experiences to the iPad. Joining iBooks and replacing Newsstand is Apple's new News app.

If you've used Flipboard, then, you'll have a pretty good idea what to expect. News aggregates news stories from around the world and brings them to your iPad.

When you first launch News, you'll be given a range of news outlets to choose, such as the Daily Mail or Vanity Fair. Then you'll get news stories from those organisations into your News app.

Apple originally announced the News app would be available in the US, UK and Australia in iOS 9. Unfortunately for those of us in the UK and Australia, that has since changed and now the News app is a US exclusive – initially anyway. The News app appears for UK users in the iOS 9.1 beta, which suggests it’ll be with us when it launches in a few months’ time.

Until that time comes, there is another way to access the News app in the UK and its fairly straight forward. Simply head to Settings > General > Language & Region, tap Region and then tap United States. Once you’ve tapped Done to save your settings, restart your device and the News app will appear on your home screen.

Read more: How to use Apple News and publish content on the service

 

Step 21 of 36: Wallet replaces Passbook - now with new features

Wallet is the new name for Apple's Passbook app. The name change reflects the prominence of Apple Pay in the app. Although Apple Pay is out in the UK already, it will be a lot more useful when iOS 9 arrives.

Wallet isn't just a name change, though. A great new feature is Loyalty Card support, so you can now pay for items in your favourite stores and get automatic loyalty card points.

Read more: How to use Apple Pay in the UK | Apple Pay UK launch guide

 

Step 22 of 36: Back button - go back to the previous app

Google Android devices have always had a Back button that takes you back to the previous screen or app.

While Apple isn't going so far as to add a new button alongside the simple Home Button, the company has added a new Back to… option in certain contexts when you're using iOS 9.

If you navigate from one app to another using the Notification pull-down or other direct jump, you'll notice a new Back to… icon in the top-left of the screen. This new button takes you back to the previous app. (The option doesn't appear if you went back to the Home screen between apps.)

Similarly, if you go to the search page (swipe right from the starting Home screen) and select an option from there, you'll be given the option to go back to the search you ran.

We think this will be a very handy new tool to use, and generally makes navigation between apps a little more user-friendly.

 

Step 23 of 36: Android Migration Assistant - helping Google users to switch

Apple is making it easier than ever to migrate (we might, controverisally, say 'upgrade') from a Google Android device to an iPhone.

A new app called Android Migration Assistant helps move all of a user's data over from their old phone to the new one. It transfers contacts, email accounts, music, photos, web history, wallpaper and any DRM-free songs and books.

It also goes through the apps on a user's old Android phone and suggests equivalents on the App Store. Apps you've paid for on Android are added to the iTunes Wish List.

A nice idea, but wouldn't it be great if Apple could go one step further and negotiate with app developers to offer discounts to iOS users who've previously bought an app on Android?

 

Step 24 of 36: iCloud Drive app icon in Settings

The iCloud Drive app has always been a bit of an oddball. Rather than being a discrete app, like Mail or Calendar, it sits behind the scenes and pops up inside other apps when needed.

One great new feature in iOS 9 is an option in Settings that turns on the iCloud Drive app, so it appears as an icon on the home screen. This enables users to access the files in the iCloud Drive.

Read next: Everything you need to know about Apple's iCloud Drive

 

Step 25 of 36: Toggle flash light on (and off) while recording video

When recording a video you can turn on the LED flash on an iPhone to light up the scene. This is great, but sometimes you don't need the flash on all the time.

It's a small touch, but in iOS 9 you can switch the LED Flash on and off during the recording of a video. So if you start recording a video and realise you need a bit more light, iOS 9 will be able to deliver.

Read next: How to shoot brilliant time-lapse videos on iPhone

 

Step 26 of 36: Improved Photos app with photo scrollbar

The Photos app has had a few upgrades that make it easier to scroll around all your images.

When you open an image, you'll notice a new thumbnail strip. Sliding your finger across the thumbnail strip moves you quickly through the photo gallery.

Another new gesture is a swipe down on Photos. This gesture dismisses the photo and moves you back to the Albums view. You can also hide multiple photos at once using the Share Sheet.

 

Step 27 of 36: New Photos folders

iOS 9 offers a simple but rather clever way to tidy up your photo library.

The Photos app generates two new folders automatically, and populates them based on the way you take individual image. If you use the front-facing camera, for example, the resulting shot will be stored in the 'Selfies' folder. Conversely, if you press the power and Home buttons simutaneously to take a screenshot of whatever's on your device's screen, you'll find the image in that folder instead.

For those of us who grab lots of screenshots of the apps we use in order to write about them, the prospect of separating these out from the 'real' photos is very appealing indeed - and those who clog up their libraries with lots of selfies may feel the same way.

 

Step 28 of 36: Bigger app folders on the iPad

While we're talking about folders, here's a small but appealing general upgrade to iOS's folder system that takes advantage of the iPad's extra screen space.

With iOS 9, iPad owners will be able to store 105 more apps per folder than in iOS 8.

You'll still be granted up to 15 pages in the folder, but on the iPad each page will be laid out in a 4x4 grid instead of 3x3, as it is in iOS 8 (and will continue to be on the iPhone). That's 16 apps per page instead of 9, for a total of 240 apps instead of 135.

 

Step 29 of 36: Siri is a lot politer (or quieter, at least)

Siri is famous for its wise-cracking answers to your questions, but in iOS 9 it gets a little bit politer.

When you mute your iPhone, Siri will no longer speak replies. Instead, it'll be quiet and just listen to your requests (and display answers on the screen). Siri also vibrates your iPhone to indicate when it's ready, rather than making noise.

Don't worry. Siri is still as smart-mouthed as ever, and we're sure it's only going to get smarter as time goes on. And don't forget all the funny Siri responses you can enjoy.

 

Step 30 of 36: Siri gets smarter

Siri isn't just politer - more importantly, it's smarter, too, and better at understanding the context behind natural-language requests.

Did your friend invite you to an event on iMessage? Just keep the request on the screen of your device and say "Remind me about this tomorrow": Siri will understand what you meant by "this" and create an appropriate reminder. In the Reminders app, you'll find the event - and also the original conversation, just in case you forgot about the entire thing and need a reminder of the details.

Siri is also able to recognise times, places and other useful parameters. Do you need to find a picture you took in a cosy café by Hampstead Heath? Say "Show me my pictures taken at Hampstead Heath", and Siri will provide what you're looking for. This works for dates and album titles as well.

 

Step 31 of 36: iOS 9 improvements to Mail

The Mail app is getting some nice improvements.

For the first time you'll be able to access and send any type of attachment. When writing an email, tap and hold the screen until the menu appears, then select the option 'Add Attachment'. Attached files can be from iCloud Driver or other services like DropBox.

You can also save attached files that have been sent to you by email directly to your iCloud Drive; just tap the attachment until a bar menu appears on the screen.

Last but not least, you'll be able to send emails with as many photos as you want. Did you get annoyed when you had 50 pictures to send but could mail only five at a time? Hold your breath until iOS 9 is released and then get crazy bothering your friend with thousands of pictures.

 

Step 32 of 36: Find My Friends and Find My iPhone now default

It's a little thing, but Apple is going to include Find My Friends and Find My iPhone as stock apps from iOS 9 onwards.

We think Find My Friends and Find My iPhone are both fantastic apps, and most iPhone and iPad owners are well aware of their existence. However, by achieving the default app status, they'll be present on all iPhone and iPad devices. So there's no excuse for anybody not to sign up for either service.

 

Step 33 of 36: Wi-Fi Assist: Automatically ignore weak Wi-Fi networks

Switching automatically from cellular data to the nearest available Wi-Fi network is a useful tool, especially if you're constantly looking for hotspots to save your data tariff. The annoying situation comes when there's an available Wi-Fi network, but it's slow or weak - maybe significantly slower than 4G. This is precisely the context in which the new Wi-Fi Assist feature will prove its worth.

With iOS 8 you lost precious seconds of your life going to settings and switching off the Wi-Fi mode, but in iOS 9 the slow Wi-Fi network will be ignored automatically and you'll continue to use cellular data. If you want to save on mobile data even at the cost of slow web access, you can opt to turn off Wi-Fi Assist.

 

Step 34 of 36: Reproductive health tracking (and other upgrades to Health)

The Health app is going to include lots of new options under iOS 9, and these were only hinted at during the WWDC 2015 keynote speech.

With an eye on the aspects of women's health that have been neglected in previous updates, Health is going to feature a new section, 'Reproductive Health', which will include six more sub-categories: Basal Body Temperature, Cervical Mucus Quality, Menstruation, Ovulation Test Result, Sexual Activity and Spotting. Here you can insert your data manually.

Tracking women's cycles may help those trying to get pregnant or avoid it, and can also help to discover health problems. The reproductive section might also help you to monitor risks of sexually transmitted diseases, since it lets you record any protected or unprotected activity.

Aside from sexual health, the Health app will also add 'UV Exposure' and 'Water Intake' options.

Read more: How iOS 9 fixes HealthKit's woman problem

 

Step 35 of 36: Wireless CarPlay

CarPlay is going wireless. With iOS 9 you can simply leave your phone in your pocket, get in your car and get started with the CarPlay experience.

At present, connecting to CarPlay in your car requires a Lightning connection, but in the future this will be all be handled wirelessly. However, don't get too excited just yet: this feature will require compatible cars, and none of these are available quite yet.

The iOS 9 update will also let you control features such as air conditioning with your iPhone.

 

Step 36 of 36: Music quality

Music experts will be delighted to know that, once iOS 9 launches, they will be able to select the highest audio quality when steaming music using a cellular connection.

With iOS 8 you weren't able to choose the audio quality of your music, which was relatively poor when streamed using cellular data.

iOS 9 will let you opt for the highest audio quality even when your device isn't on a Wi-Fi network; the music will take longer to stream but you'll get an improved experience.

Also read:

How to use Apple's Notes app in iOS 9

How to get the Apple News app in iOS 9

How to use Proactive in iOS 9

How to search in iOS 9

How to use public-transport directions in iOS 9 Apple Maps

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