iPhoto iPad tutorial: Find your way around iPhoto 2 for the iPad and iPhone

Find your way around iPhoto for iOS

iPhoto on the iPad and iPhone is very different to iPhoto on the Mac. Here’s how to find your way around

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Step 1 of 10:

If you’re used to iPhoto on your Mac, iPhoto 2.0 for iOS will come as a shock: the two versions now look very different. Whereas the Mac version has four main browsing modes – Events, Photos, Faces and Places – the iOS app opens in Photos view, with Albums and Projects at the bottom of the screen.

See also: More iPhoto projects

Next Prev slideshow image

If you’re used to iPhoto on your Mac, iPhoto 2.0 for iOS will come as a shock: the two versions now look very different. Whereas the Mac version has four main browsing modes – Events, Photos, Faces and Places – the iOS app opens in Photos view, with Albums and Projects at the bottom of the screen.

See also: More iPhoto projects

Step 2 of 10:

The Photos view lists photos by the month they were captured, giving a quick overview of your entire library. Tap on a particular month to open an editing mode. We’re not ready to start editing just yet, though, so return to Photos view by tapping the left arrow (<) in the toolbar at the top of the screen.

Step 3 of 10:

An Options menu is accessible via three dots in the bottom-right corner. Here you’ll find a number of options for viewing and organising photos. The Options menu is context-sensitive, so it will show different options depending on the selected tool or viewing mode. Now let’s tap on Albums to delve a little deeper.

Step 4 of 10:

The iOS version of iPhoto uses ‘Albums’ as a catch-all term that covers, well, pretty much everything. Events I’ve imported from iPhoto or Faces I identified on my Mac are listed here, as is my iCloud Photo Stream library. This Album view also includes any recently viewed, edited or tagged photos.

Step 5 of 10:

Tap on any photo or album to enter iPhoto’s editing window. To help you find your way around, tap the question mark icon at the top of the screen to browse a series of tool tips. If you need more detailed advice, visit iPhoto’s online Help system by tapping ‘Get more help’ on the right edge of the screen.

Step 6 of 10:

Editing mode also includes a number of other options for browsing and selecting photos. Quickly double-tap a photo and iPhoto will find similar shots, as seen in the screenshot above. This makes it easy to select and compare a series of similar photos, perhaps for use in a slideshow or photobook.

Step 7 of 10:

You can quickly select and view a sequence of photos by simultaneously tapping the first and last shots in the series. You can then tag the entire group of photos at once, and this collection will also show up as a new album in iPhoto’s Albums view.

Step 8 of 10:

When you’ve found your favourite photos you’ll probably want to share them. Tap the Share icon to bring up various sharing options. You can email your photos or upload them to Facebook, Flickr or Twitter, for example. iPhoto for iOS also now supports AirDrop, and you can beam snaps to a nearby iDevice.

Step 9 of 10:

Also in the Share menu are three options for creating Projects. Using these options you can create slideshows that can be played on your iPad or published to iCloud. You can also design a Web Journal (or digital scrapbook), and order a professionally printed photobook.

Step 10 of 10:

iOS devices can use Photo Stream to share photos between devices. However, this works only when the secondary device is logged into your iCloud account. Missing in iPhoto but found in the Photos app is iCloud Photo Sharing, which lets you create and share Photo Streams with others.

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