Macworld Masterclass: Using Pages to create an ePub file

Pages provides a quick and elegant way to make ePub documents

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  • idea for Pages to iPad Intro
  • mw pages ePub 01 Step 1: Document setup
  • mw pages ePub 02 Step 2: Front cover
  • mw pages ePub 03 Step 3: Table of contents
  • mw pages ePub 04 Step 4: Adding styles
  • mw pages ePub 05 Step 5: Hierarchy ofs tyles
  • mw pages ePub 06 Step 6: Limits of style
  • mw pages ePub 07 Step 7: Populating contents
  • mw pages ePub 08 Step 8: Adding illustrations
  • mw pages ePub 09 Step 9: More media
  • mw pages ePub 10 Step 10: Spotlight title
  • mw pages ePub 11 Step 11: Export your work
  • mw pages ePub 12 Step 12: What's your genre?
  • mw pages ePub 13 Step 13: Where to save
  • mw pages ePub 14 Step 14: Sync via iTunes
  • mw pages ePub 15 Step 15: Reader and listen
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Intro

Used in the majority of iOS publications ePub is a free and open ebook standard. Developed by the International Digital Publishing Forum (IDPF), its file extension is .epub. Pages is just one of many applications that can export these files, and the hope is that this single format can be used by publishers for free distribution or sale with multi-platform compatibility. It has superseded the Open ebook standard.

This tutorials illustrates the basic rules for making .epub files. The idea is that content can reflow, meaning text including titles, sub-headers and so on, can be optimised for different devices and different user preferences.

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Next Prev idea for Pages to iPad

Used in the majority of iOS publications ePub is a free and open ebook standard. Developed by the International Digital Publishing Forum (IDPF), its file extension is .epub. Pages is just one of many applications that can export these files, and the hope is that this single format can be used by publishers for free distribution or sale with multi-platform compatibility. It has superseded the Open ebook standard.

This tutorials illustrates the basic rules for making .epub files. The idea is that content can reflow, meaning text including titles, sub-headers and so on, can be optimised for different devices and different user preferences.

 

Step 2 of 16: Step 1: Document setup

We’re using the Mac OS version of Pages here as the iOS version doesn’t have the ability to export ePub files. Launch Pages and from the Template Chooser select a Word Processing, Blank portrait orientation document. Don’t use the Page Layout Templates as they will not export to ePub.

 

Step 3 of 16: Step 2: Front cover

At the top of your first page type a title, then press Return and credit yourself as the author. With the Insertion Point flashing after your name, go to Insert > Page Break. There’s no need to worry about Page Setup unless you want to proof-print the Pages document to, for example, A4.

 

Step 4 of 16: Step 3: Table of contents

You should now be on Page 2. Go to Insert > Table Of Contents. A box will warn you that the table of contents is empty. Don’t worry about this. Check the Insertion Point is flashing after the Table Of Contents box. Go to Insert > Page Break. On Page 3 type ‘Chapter One’, press Return and type a few words.

 

Step 5 of 16: Step 4: Adding styles

With your text typed, go to Insert > Page Break. On Page 4 type ‘Chapter Two’, press Return and add a few words. Save your work. Next, open the Paragraph Styles pane. Go to Page 1, select your title and from Paragraph Styles choose Title. Your text will automatically receive the Body paragraph style.

 

Step 6 of 16: Step 5: Hierarchy ofs tyles

Go to where you typed ‘Chapter One’ and choose the Heading 1 paragraph style. Repeat this for ‘Chapter Two’. Here we’ve added a sub-header, which has been given the Heading 2 formatting. You can use this hierarchy of styles to order your documents, or create alternative styles for picture caption text.

 

Step 7 of 16: Step 6: Limits of style

Here the title and chapter headings have had their styles redefined. It’s a simple process, though you should note that ebook readers have a limited amount of fonts, so the Blackmoor font used here will be substituted by another. Colour formatting is honoured, so the title will be red in the ePub file.

 

Step 8 of 16: Step 7: Populating contents

Go to your Table Of Contents. Click on it and the table will display the two chapter headings. Here the sub-header appears as a subordinate of the chapters. Using heading styles is essential to ePub navigation. The TOC Inspector can be used to limit which levels of heading appear in the Contents.

 

Step 9 of 16: Step 8: Adding illustrations

ePub supports inline raster and vector graphics, so you can add photographs and other bitmap files. Pages allows for Inline, Floating or In Background graphic objects. Graphics have to be Inline. Use the Media Browser’s Photo tab and grab a photo. Drag it onto your Pages document.

 

Step 10 of 16: Step 9: More media

By default graphics float, so use the Wrap Inspector to set the photo to Inline; you may have to drag photos back into position. Use the Media Browser to drag movies and audio into your Pages document. Here a film and song have been taken from our iTunes library.

 

Step 11 of 16: Step 10: Spotlight title

Check all placed objects to ensure they are Inline. You may also want to use the Info Inspector to add your name as author and give your work a title. The title given in the Info Inspector can be different from the Pages file name. A title added here becomes the name of the ePub book in an ebook reader.

 

Step 12 of 16: Step 11: Export your work

Your work is now ready to publish. Go to Share > Export. At this point a dialog box may appear warning you that graphics have not been set to Inline. Other alerts can be ignored since they will relate to formatting features that are not available in ePub. From the Export window select ePub.

 

Step 13 of 16: Step 12: What's your genre?

If you’ve added a Title and Author in the Info Inspector they will appear here. You can choose a genre for your work, by either selecting from the options available or typing in your own. The ‘Use first page as book cover image’ is a great option. Now choose Next…

 

Step 14 of 16: Step 13: Where to save

It’s possible to navigate to the Books folder in iTunes and save the ePub file there, though we prefer to save the ePub file in the same location as the Pages document. Then in Finder, right-click the newly exported ePub file and choose Open With > iTunes. This ensures iTunes knows your book has arrived.

 

Step 15 of 16: Step 14: Sync via iTunes

Connect your iPad or iPhone, and open iTunes. In the Book tab make sure your new ePub title is ticked. If you chose the ‘Use first page as book cover image’ you’ll recognise the artwork. You can go ahead and sync your iOS device. When you’ve synced, check out your ePub book.

 

Step 16 of 16: Step 15: Reader and listen

Here in landscape mode we can see the three types of media added to the ePub Book. Tapping the movie will cause it to play. Movies can be viewed in Full Screen. The audio file has a Play and scrub bar. Remember to test your ePubs on a variety of devices to see how they perform.

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