Tidy up your library in iPhoto for Mac OS X

Learn how iPhoto's Events, Photos, Faces and Places sections can be used to classify your pictures, making them easily accessible; then how to share your photos with friends and family.

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iPhoto organises your photo Library into four main sections. ‘Events’ (shown here) groups together shots that were taken on the same day, while ‘Photos’ shows your entire library as a list. 

The ‘Faces’ section uses face-recognition technology to detect faces, and if your camera has a GPS feature, then ‘Places’ groups together pictures that were taken in the same location.

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Next Prev Step 1

iPhoto organises your photo Library into four main sections. ‘Events’ (shown here) groups together shots that were taken on the same day, while ‘Photos’ shows your entire library as a list. 

The ‘Faces’ section uses face-recognition technology to detect faces, and if your camera has a GPS feature, then ‘Places’ groups together pictures that were taken in the same location.

Read:

 

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By default, iPhoto creates one event per day, but if you’re a serious snapper you can organise events more precisely in the Preferences Panel. Under the ‘General’ tab you’ll find an option that lets you ‘autosplit’ photos into new events every two or eight hours.

You can also set this option to create a new event every week.

 

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There are also times when iPhoto needs a little help. It was only when we imported these images that we realised the date settings on the camera were wrong and the photos were listed as being taken on 19 July 2010. To fix this, use -A, then open the ‘Photos’ menu.

Select ‘Adjust Date And Time’, then enter the correct date for an entire set of photos in one go.

 

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You can give each event its own name, but there’s an command in the Photo menu that lets you quickly name individual photos.

Use the ‘Batch Change’ command to assign a title to each photo. We’ll give all our photos the same title – ATP Masters 2013 – and click the box marked ‘Append a number to each photo’ to add a number to each photo as well.

 

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To dig a little deeper, hit Cmd-I to display the main Info panel. This displays much of the ‘metadata’ that is part of each photo file, including the date the photo was taken, its resolution and even the camera’s lens settings.

You can also add keyword information here, such as ‘Nadal’ and ‘Tennis’, which will help me to identify these photos for future searches.

 

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Another powerful feature in iPhoto is its ability to detect faces.

The first time you click on Faces, iPhoto will show you some of the faces it’s spotted and ask you to name as many as you can. We’ve filled in a few names, but iPhoto says there are another 334 faces still waiting to be named. Fortunately, there’s a way to speed things up if we just hit ‘Continue To Faces’.

 

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Once you’ve identified someone in two or three photos, iPhoto will recognise that person in other pictures.

If we click on a picture of James, for example, then iPhoto will show us a list of ‘unconfirmed faces’ it thinks might be him.

Some of them are wrong, but we can click on the pictures that do show James to confirm his identity, or Alt-click to reject images.

 

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iPhoto also has options for quickly searching and organising your photo library.

Open the View menu at the top of the screen and tell iPhoto to sort through your snaps by date, title, rating or keyword.

There’s also a Search tool in the lower-left corner that can locate photos using any keyword, name or title that you’ve added to your photos.

 

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The software’s ‘Smart Albums’ option could also prove useful.

Select New Smart Album from the File menu and iPhoto will create an album that includes photos with any name, title, face, or even camera settings that you specify.

In addition, any new photos you add in the future that match these search criteria will automatically be added to your smart albums.

 

Step 10 of 10:

Once you’ve organised all your photos you’ll want to share them with your friends.

There are plenty of options built into iPhoto, from ordering prints and calendars, to email or uploading them to Facebook.

There’s even an iCloud option. This is where things get a little tricky, though, so we’ll be taking a closer look at iCloud’s sharing options here.

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