Google's CEO Larry Page spoke for the first time in public in months, addressing the company's annual Zeitgeist conference in Paradise Valley, Arizona on Tuesday, a spokesman confirmed.

Page has not spoken in public since June, when a company spokeswoman said he had lost his voice and would not be speaking at the company's upcoming public events, including the Google I/O developer conference scheduled for the next week. The news lead to some panic over Page's health based on the example set by Apple's late CEO Steve Jobs who initially kept his cancer secret. 

Earlier Google's executive chairman Eric Schmidt had told shareholders at Google's Mountain View headquarters that Page would not be speaking at the developer conference, and also possibly at the company's second-quarter earnings call, scheduled for July. Page did not speak at the shareholder event.

The Google spokeswoman did not provide information on the medical condition that had affected Page's voice. He was noticed to have difficulty in speaking and his voice was strained in his recent speeches at the time.

In his speech at the Zeitgeist conference, Page is said to have spoken with "a raspy voice," but went on to address a number of issues including Google's negotiations with antitrust regulators, The Wall Street Journal reported. He said he was "still a little hoarse," the newspaper reported.

Page, Google's co-founder, replaced Schmidt as CEO last year.

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