Microsoft today revealed Windows 7 at its annual Professional Developers Conference (PDC) in Los Angeles. Windows 7 is designed to replace Windows Vista as the main operating system for Windows-based PC users.

With Apple's OS X Snow Leopard also under development, we met up with Ian Moulster, Windows Live Commercial Lead for Microsoft to talk through some of Microsoft's key ideas and discover what the next-generation of operating systems aim to offer both Mac and PC users.

At this year's WWDC, Apple announced that the next version of its operating system would take a break from introducing new features and focus on performance. “We have delivered more than a thousand new features to OS X in just seven years and Snow Leopard lays the foundation for thousands more,” said Bertrand Serlet, Apple’s senior vice president of Software Engineering. “In our continued effort to deliver the best user experience, we hit the pause button on new features to focus on perfecting the world’s most advanced operating system.”

The OS X update, expected to ship in June 2009, will be optimized for multi-core processors and enable “breakthrough amounts of RAM – up to a theoretical 16TB.” Apple also promised a new, modern media platform with QuickTime X. The update will also offer out-of-the-box support for Microsoft Exchange 2007.

On the other side of the fence, Microsoft has had highly publicised troubles with its Vista operating system. So our first question to Microsoft was whether Windows 7 was a smokescreen for fixing some of the problems with Vista. "No" was the answer "Service Packs 1 and 2 are fixing things", said Microsoft's Ian Moulster. "This is less about fixing things and more about building on the good stuff. This is about where we go from here".

Having got that out of they way, we got stuck into discussing the future of the operating system. It's clear that Snow Leopard is about much more than just a speed bump, and Microsoft has more than just a few "borrowed" ideas being used to fix Vista's flaws.

So let's get started with the biggest news... Sometime next year the desktop and laptop computer is highly likely to sport multi-touch, touch-screen technology.

Next: Touch-screen technology confirmed