Samsung has offered to disable some of its Galaxy Tab 10.1 features in order to overturn a ban on sales of the device in Australia.

The BBC reports that Samsung made the offer to Apple so it can launch the controversial device in the country after a weeks-long court case.

The dispute centres on Apple's claims that the Galaxy Tab 10.1 infringes 10 patents relating to the iPad, three of which relate to the touchscreen technology including one which covers "selective rejection" technology ensuring accidental touches to the iPad don’t result in programs being launched.

Apple also alleges Samsung has been misleading consumers by insinuating the Galaxy Tab 10.1 is a version of the iPad 2 and offers the same performance as Apple's tablet PC.

Samsung voluntarily agreed to postpone the Australian launch of the device until the legal action had been resolved, with a verdict expected at some stage this week. However, Apple is now mulling over Samsung's offer, but said it needed time to consider the merit of Samsung's proposals, according to the BBC.

Samsung's move could mark a change of tactics - it had previously launched a counter-offensive in Australian courts, making its own accusations of patent infringement against Apple.

It has also reportedly threatened to launch legal action against the next-generation iPhone when it is launched tomorrow.

But if Apple were to accept Samsung's offer, the verdict of the Australian case would become irrelevant, with Samsung having made changes to or completely disabling features that caused the contention.