Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak has been known to be a bit of a chatterbox, and this week has been no exception. Wozniak, or Woz as he is more fondly known, has been (really) busy talking about Ashton Kutcher's Steve Jobs movie, the history of Apple and the 'lousy' Macintosh, Kim Kardashian and Kanye West's baby, the NSA scandal, iOS 7, the new Mac Pro and lots, lots more.

Just in case you don't feel like reading everything Woz said this week, we picked out some of the highlights.

When speaking about AirDrop in iOS 7: "I don't necessarily think Apple does everything best."

On the Mac Pro: "I hope it goes big."

After saying Jobs was not a saint in his early years at Apple, but only when he came back and helped launch the iPod: "We truly could have used the later Jobs in earlier years at Apple, is what I feel."

On Steve Jobs and the 'lousy' Macintosh: "The Macintosh failed, really hard, and who built the Macintosh into a success later on? It wasn't Steve, he was gone. It was other people like John Sculley who worked and worked to build a Macintosh market when the Apple II went away."

On Tim Cook's ability to run Apple: "Wait until we see if Apple has a few dogs that come out, and then you can start saying that something’s missing."

Our last highlight from Woz this week: "Of course, I'm kinda weird."

So, for those of you who are intrigued and want to find out what else Woz has been talking about this week, here's the week's Woz interviews in more detail.

Woz on the NSA scandal and Edward Snowden

Edward Snowden, the man who leaked information about a National Security Agency (NSA) program code-named PRISM that is said to give the NSA "direct access" to the servers of companies including Apple, Facebook, Microsoft and Google, is on the run from the government, and Wozniak has this week said that thinks the hunt for Snowden highlights that freedom in America is "just a joke."

See: Apple emphasizes user-privacy efforts in response to PRISM accusations

"The government is just upset because he embarrassed them," Woz told New York Daily News. "We think we’re the most free and fair country in the world. It’s like the NSA is giving themselves permission to do what they want. At first we thought technology would give us less restriction, but with digital technology, nothing is private anymore - not even our email."

Speaking to The Daily Beast, Wozniak also branded Snowden a hero. "I think Edward Snowden is a hero because this came from his heart," Woz continued. "And I really believe he was giving up his whole life because he just felt so deeply about honesty, about spying on Americans, and he wanted to tell us."

Woz explained that, when the internet first came, it was viewed as a beacon of freedom for everyone across the world to communicate with one another. "Now it turns out that every single thing we send as email counts as publicly viewable and it’s totally open and exposed, and can be taken for whatever reason."

Woz said that, if Microsoft and Apple had build PGP (Pretty Good Privacy) encryption software into their products, "every email would have been encrypted and uncrackable."

Last week, Woz compared the US to communist Russia during an interview with FayerWayer.

Woz on Australia

In the past, Woz has expressed an interest in moving to Australia, but when NYDN asked whether the move was due to his concerns about the US government, he said: "I don’t expect to move there full-time for a few years. I’m currently doing a lot of speaking engagements, and I can easily fly (out of Northern California). That would be harder from the airport in Australia. There’s so much to learn about Australia, and I can work toward my citizenship when I’m there. But I don’t plan to give up my American citizenship either."

Woz on iOS 7 and the new Mac Pro

Woz admitted that he hasn't yet tried iOS 7, but his first impressions of the new mobile operating system from what he saw at WWDC 2013 is that is looks "very beautiful." However, he did say that he wasn't overly impressed with Apple's introduction of AirDrop to iOS 7, comparing the new feature to Samsung's Bump. "I don't necessarily think Apple does everything best," he said.

Speaking later to Slash Gear, Woz said that he likes the Mac Pro's drastic change in design, noting that it reminds him of the Power Mac G4 Cube, echoing the thoughts of some of the Macworld UK editors.

After initially questioning how capable the new Mac Pro would be in the professional market, Woz  concluded that it will be a game-changer, and that he "hopes it goes big."

Above: Apple's Cube (left) compared with the new Mac Pro (right)

Woz on the Steve Jobs movie

A new, two-minute trailer of the Steve Jobs biopic starring Two and a Half Men's Ashton Kutcher was released last week, and Woz has a few things to say about it. "I allow a lot of artistic interpretation for the sake of entertainment and inspiration, as long as the implied meanings of the scenes are accurate," Woz told Gizmodo. "I can't judge that until I see the film."

"I have a little bug in me that says this movie will portray Steve as a saint who was ignored, rather than one of the key people who led Apple through failure after failure (Apple III, LISA, Macintosh) while the revenues poured in from the Apple II that Jobs was trying to kill," Woz continued. "It's nice to have the luxury to fail. The Macintosh market was created in the 3 years after Jobs left, with a lot of effort, by some who Jobs disdains.

"Jobs came back as the saint and god we now recognize and did then head the creation of other products as great as the Apple II, like the iTunes store, the iPod, the retail stores, the iPhone and the iPad. But he was a different person, more experienced and more thoughtful and more capable of running Apple in those later years.

Above: Josh Gad and Ashton Kutcher as Woz and Jobs in the upcoming biopic

"We truly could have used the later Jobs in earlier years at Apple, is what I feel," Woz added.

Woz was a little happier with Josh Gad's portrayal of him in the trailer than he had been when he saw the one-minute-long clip of the film that was revealed in January. "I was ok with how it showed me, unlike the first preview," he said. "Other characters like Sculley and Markkula are wildly exaggerated in ways that tend to portray them as sleazy or something. In fact, they both had the same high ideals of where computers could lead us as Steve did."

It's expected that Jobs, will hit cinemas in August, after it was delayed from its original 19 April release date. The film premiered at the Sundance Film Festival earlier this year but received mixed reviews from those who saw it.

Woz on Steve Jobs and the 'lousy' Macintosh

Wozniak isn't against Steve Jobs movies altogether, though. He is an advisor on Sony's adaptation of Walter Isaacson's Steve Jobs autobiography, the screenplay for which has been written by The Social Network writer Aaron Sorkin.

In (another) interview this week, this time with The Verge, Woz said: "I really admire the way [Sorkin] is going to make that film. I think it's going to bring out Jobs' personality and characteristics and thinking and vision very well at three key, important times."

"Introducing the Macintosh, Steve was still young, trying to move too fast, and not regulated enough to really create a good product, a successful product," said Woz, explaining that he believes Jobs had three failures during his time at Apple.

Woz said that it was during Steve Jobs' time at NeXT that he learned how to become a person who come back to Apple and run the company, and wait until products were really ready before launching them, something Woz doesn't believe happened with the Lisa and the Macintosh

"The Macintosh should've been a whole different product, not a mouse-driven GUI machine like it was, and the Lisa he should've just waited five years, and then it would've been ready. When he introduced the iPod, that was the next Apple II," Woz continued. "That's what makes people really love Steve Jobs to this day, the iPod, the iPhone, the iPad, and how much they meant to our lives."

"Steve really took over the [Macintosh] project when I had a plane crash and wasn't there." said Woz. "What he did was he made a really weak, lousy computer, to tell you truth, in the Macintosh, and still at a fairly high price. He made it by cutting the RAM down, by forcing you to swap disks here and there. It was a lousy product. Every time we improved the Macintosh, year by year by year, it got closer to what the Lisa had been."

He concluded: "The Macintosh failed, really hard, and who built the Macintosh into a success later on? It wasn't Steve, he was gone. It was other people like John Sculley who worked and worked to build a Macintosh market when the Apple II went away."

When asked whether he thinks Sorkin will do a good job conveying Apple's history in his movie, Woz replied: "He's going to have Steve Jobs interacting with all these key people - very quick dialog that brings out Steve's thinking, and his wisdom and his guidance and his vision, and other people that were in the way and what some of the conflicts were and how Steve… I'm sure he's going to treat some people nasty, you know? And how he might just really grab onto others and love them and take their ideas. So I think it's going to be a great, great movie."

Read the full interview here.

Woz meets Kim Kardashian and Kanye West's baby North West

Yep, it's true. Despite being just days old, reality TV star Kim Kardashian and musician Kanye West's baby girl, North West, has already met Steve Wozniak. And that was before she had even met her own uncle.

Woz told Piers Morgan on his show Piers Morgan Live that Kardashian invited him to meet baby North because her dad, Kanye West, is "interested in technology and companies." Woz was a birthday present to Kanye, explained Woz. "Kim had me come up there to meet him."

You can watch the video of Woz talking about meeting the baby below.

Later, when speaking to New York Daily News, Woz provided further information about the occasion: "Kim had been calling me and my wife and wanted me to meet Kanye. So she put us up at the Beverly Hills Hotel so we could meet. But that’s when she ended up going into labour! Kanye didn’t want to leave to see us because he didn’t want people to think he was leaving Kim alone at the hospital, so we ended up going there. I spent two hours talking to Kanye. My wife spent two hours with Kim. I realized I have a lot in common with him. I shared my belief in having a good woman around, and I thought, Kim’s really showing that she’s a good woman. There’s a feeling of true love. I have it (with my wife), so I know!"

Woz on Apple I auction

An Apple I is being auctioned by Christie's and is expected to be sold for somewhere in the region of $500,000. "There are so few of them now that they mean so much to the world. I’m glad of that; it’s cool! But I would never sell my Apple I," said Woz.

Woz on Tim Cook

Woz believes that it is "too early to decide" how successful Apple CEO Tim Cook will be at maintaining Apple's innovative reputation following the death of co-founder Steve Jobs.

"Steve Jobs'reputation largely comes from being this great visionary - and that largely comes from products that came out of Apple. Really incredible products don’t come every year. So wait until we see if Apple has a few dogs that come out, and then you can start saying that something’s missing.”

Woz on car tech

When we said Steve Wozniak had been busy this week, we really weren't joking. He also spoke at Ford's Trend Conference, where he confessed that he is "kinda weird."

During the conference, Woz said that he doesn't think touchscreens are the best solution for in-car infotainment, because "it's hard to find the right button to press without reaching over and taking your eyes off the road even further."

Woz suggested that a Google Glass-like solution could be a better option. “Your eye can really be very much on the road, the conditions ahead of you, though not 100-percent,” he said. “You could use that display and get yourself in trouble, so I would have to drive a car and try it.”

Woz confessed that he once experimented with the use of special glasses while driving.  “Of course, I’m kinda weird,” he stated. “One time I put on prism glasses – the glasses where you lie back in bed and watch TV – and I drove down my street like this [pretends to lay back in the drivers seat]." He did reassure the audience that this experiment was conducted on a quiet road with no cars around, though.