Apple has revamped its entire Power Mac G4 line-up to include the new Rage 128 Pro graphics card, featuring "up to a 40 per cent increase in 3D graphics performance" and a digital video interface that supports Apple’s new digitally-driven LCD displays. In addition, the 350MHz Power Mac G4 has been upgraded from its old Yikes logic board to the faster Sawtooth board already found in the 400MHz and 450MHz models. All currently available Power Mac G4 configurations are now based on the Sawtooth design, with AirPort capability.

All three machines now ship with ATI's Rage 128 Pro AGP graphics cards. And it looks like curtains for the old CD-ROM drives in Apple systems, with the 350MHz G4 swapping its CD for a DVD-ROM drive.

New range in full The new 350MHz Power Mac G4 sells for £1,099 and includes 64MB of RAM, 1MB of Level 2 backside cache, the Rage 128 Pro graphics card with 16MB of VRAM, a 10GB Ultra ATA/66 hard drive, a DVD-ROM drive with DVD-Video playback, FireWire and USB ports, 10/100Base-T ethernet, and a built-in V.90 56K modem.

The new 400MHz G4 sells for £1,699 and includes 128MB of RAM, 1MB of Level 2 backside cache, the Rage 128 Pro card with 16MB of VRAM, a 20GB Ultra ATA/66 hard drive, a DVD-ROM drive with DVD-Video playback, a Zip drive, FireWire and USB ports, 10/100Base-T ethernet, and a built-in V.90 56K modem.

The new 450MHz G4 sells for £2,399 and includes 256MB of SDRAM, 1MB of Level 2 backside cache, the Rage 128 Pro card with 16MB of VRAM, a 27GB Ultra ATA/66 hard drive, DVD-RAM drive with DVD-Video playback, a Zip drive, FireWire and USB ports, and 10/100Base-T ethernet.

“The new Power Mac G4 configurations offer significantly higher graphics performance and bring breakthrough features, like AirPort, across the entire G4 product line,” said Phil Schiller, Apple’s vice president of Worldwide Product Marketing.

The new models are available now from the online Apple Store, but check with other retail outlets that you're buying the newer versions and not remaining stocks of the old models.

Most Mac-watchers saw the old 350MHz machine as a tarted-up blue-&-white Power Mac G3 with a G4 processor - a stopgap measure by Apple to resolve production difficulties and get the G4 to market as soon as possible.