The Norwegian government began an appeal case Tuesday in the Oslo Appeals Court against John Lech Johansen, also known as DVD Jon.

Økokrim, an agency of the Norwegian government that focuses on economic crime, has brought the appeal, a spokeswoman for Johansen's attorney, Halvor Manshaus, of law firm Schjødt, said today.

Johansen was acquitted in January of charges regarding his development of software that allows DVDs to be played on any player. The software, DeCSS (De Contents Scramble System), breaks the digital copy-protection mechanism (CSS or Contents Scramble System) that manufacturers often put on DVDs.

In January, the Oslo City Court found that Johansen was entitled to access information on a DVD he had purchased and was therefore entitled to use his program to break the code. The DeCSS program, like many others, could be useful for both legal and illegal purposes, but Johansen's motives were not to encourage illegal use, the court found.

Last week, Johansen released software called QTFairUse. This is capable of evading the anticopying technology that protects tracks sold through Apple's iTunes Music Store – but only on Windows.

Manshaus and Johansen were in court Wednesday and unable to immediately comment. However, in January Manshaus said he was confident than an appeal would not be successful as the same arguments and evidence would be put before the appeals court.

The case is expected to last for eight days, the Schjødt spokeswoman said.