Kingston DataTraveler HyperX Predator review

In total contrast to the dainty little Integral drive, Kingston’s DataTraveler HyperX Predator is a chunky hard metallic lump of zinc alloy. It’s a complete thumbdrive device with built-in USB plug that’s exposed by closing the sliding case together. It lends itself to use as a keyring, with a small metal tag on one end, and a substantial key clip assembly is supplied in the presentation tin.

Also included is a short USB 3.0 extension cable, which helps you to use the drive where it’s not practical to plug in a large and potentially port-threatening thumbdrive – you wouldn’t want to plug this 63 g drive into some USB ports unsupported.

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Capacity is not in question here, as the Predator is available in formidable 512 GB and 1 TB sizes. The smaller model we tested can be found for £520, which equates to just over £1 per gigabyte.

As a self-contained thumbdrive, we wouldn’t expect the best in data speeds since as UASP operation hasn’t yet trickled down to appear in even high-end thumbdrives yet. But this flash thumbdrive did prove the fastest in some areas, when compared to other non-SATA based devices.

For sequential reads, it averaged 304 MB/s, while writes were two-thirds that figure at 200 MB/s. Small files will zip across much slower as we found with all thumbdrive-style drives, here just 22 MB/s when averaged for files of 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512 and 1024 kB size. We also tried testing with and without the short 160 mm extension cable, and found it performed essentially the same.

OUR VERDICT

The Kingston Predator is a macho piece of metal that manages to squeeze in half a terabyte of flash storage into its chunky frame – with a whole terabyte promised in a few months. It’s far from subtle, but lends itself to making a keyring that you’re unlikely to leave lying around, if only because half a grand is a lot to lose.

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