Shure SE215 review

Since they’re the second most expensive earphones we looked at, we’ve got to begin our review of the Shures with some negatives. There is, however, plenty of good stuff to follow.

Like the Phonaks, these have an inverted design, with the cable running over the top of the ear. However, we struggled to get this arrangement to work – the earpieces kept popping out the ear. It’s important to jiggle them into place – imagine that you’re applying earplugs, which the default, solid foam earpieces resemble. (This is indicated in the accompanying leaflet, but it didn’t occur to us that there would be instructions on how to put on a pair of earphones.)

Another annoyance was the fact that we encountered problems changing the earbuds – prying them off was like getting chewing gum off a trainer. Since most people will have to try several different sizes before they find an earbud that fits, we would have liked Shure to have made them easier to change.

Once we’d managed to fit them in, the Shures produced such good audio that we quickly forgot our petty quibbles. Disco is rendered with a monstrous, thick bass punch, even if the upper end could get a shade distorted at high volume. Prog rock felt realistic, warm and dynamic, and revealed details of the recording that weren’t apparent with the other earphones in this group test.

The sound produced by these earphones is immense

OUR VERDICT

Perhaps the most impressive test here, though, was classical piano, where we were treated to a rich, dramatic sound, with even the excellent-sounding Altec Lansing headphones unable to match the bass presence.

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