iTView

The iTView is a multi-function product pitched at both business and home iMac and iMac DV users. This PC-to-TV video-conversion tool is being touted as a workplace saviour, enabling computer presentations to be displayed on larger-screen TVs. The palm-sized device connects an iMac DV or iMac DV SE to a TV, or to a TV-video combination. The non-DV version is an extra £40, as it includes a VGA adaptor. First things first. I couldn’t get a picture worth the name on my TV. All I got was a ghosted and reversed-out image of my desktop on the TV screen. The iTView comes with three types of cabling – S-Video, a high-quality standard; composite; and SCART – my telly has none of them. (Time to buy a new TV – Ed.) The broken-up image I did get was achieved by connecting the TV to the iTView via the VCR, using the SCART cable (the video-connection standard in Europe). I was told by Focus that, because my TV was old, I needed to buy an RF (radio frequency) modulator (£25; Maplins, 0181 555 6254). If I’d bought the iTView, this would have sent me into a fury. It’s worth checking your TV before buying. As for picture quality, I can only refer to iTView’s specs: it supports 640-x-480 pixels to 1,024-x-768 pixels at frequencies up to 152Hz.

OUR VERDICT

ow iTView can be much use for work or school presentations is lost on me. An image on a 29-inch TV won’t be that informative if you’re at the back of a room. Projectors are the logical solution. As for using the iTView to Web-surf or play games on the TV I failed to see the attraction – literally. Where’s the convenience in lumping an iMac through the house to your TV and setting up a nest of cabling? Serious surfers and gamers may feel differently. If you’re desperate to transfer iMovies to video tape then you will need iTView – as long as you don’t mind subsidizing its other overblown functions.

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