MegaSeg

DJ’s now top the charts with tedious regularity: they are worshiped by ravers around the world and make money that competes with Premier League footballers. It’s no wonder that so many people are trying to hitch their wagon on the gravy train that is club DJing. But if you can’t afford the price of twin Technics decks and a mixer, there’s a cheaper way to hone your DJing skills. Fidelity Media has released MegaSeg, a tool for playing MP3s, DJ-style, with mixes, segues and intros. Free, all right now
It doesn’t have quite the same charm as vinyl, but there is a mountain of music available, some of it even legal. Check out MP3.com and you will see an ocean of music files, some home made, some professionally done. All of them are free. MegaSeg keeps track of songs and lets you add information, such as intro-time, cue-in time, segue time and BPM (beat per minute). This is essential information for a DJ, especially when trying to keep a beat going during cross-fades. But the control over BPM is not what it would be when mixing with vinyl. The speed of playback can be increased or decreased, but there’s no way to change the speed of an individual tune. This means beats can’t be matched, even if the BPM of both songs is known. Also, the pitch or speed of the song is shown as a percentage rather than BPM. So being able to set the BPM for each song doesn’t actually do anything at playback. MegaSeg isn’t going to impress pro DJs, but there are advantages to using it. House parties are ideal, because a playlist with hours of music can be loaded, or different playlists for different moods. A whole night’s entertainment without needing to make a party tape or change the CD. Whether you could actually have a party without some fool insisting on playing his favourite grunge-garage-jungle-bogle-trip-hop tape, is debatable. Though if you were to insist on MP3-format only, it might deter people interfering. Given an endless list of tracks to play, MegaSeg will tirelessly segue between songs, without chat or comment. It may not be mixed like LTJ Bukem, or even DLT, but you won’t have to do it yourself, and it’s better that a compilation tape. If you really want to be the next Grand Wizard Theodore or Spinderella you’ll never recreate the sound of vinyl with this app, but perhaps future versions will be better.

OUR VERDICT

MegaSeg isn’t about to replace DJs in most situations, but with some improvements, it could. Adding real cross-fades and automating BPM matching would make it a more attractive proposition. The price of $200 (about £140 is steep for something so basic. I wouldn’t be surprised to see some mixing features appear in SoundJam, for example. But it does a reasonable job, as long as you don’t expect too much. If it were my money, I‘d hold out for a few more features in a future version. It does what it says, but it’s still short of being a real DJ tool. It’s missing some essentials.

Find the best price