It’s made of smooth plastic, has dimples, and comes in a variety of fruity colours. But that’s where the MouseBean’s similarities with an Ann Summers product end, unless you’re very imaginative. It’s actually a wrist-rest for your mouse hand. The device sits behind your mouse on the desk, with the ball of your hand resting on the padded top surface. The idea is that by raising the forearm to maintain a level wrist position, pressure on the median nerve and the tendons that run through the carpal tunnel in the wrist is relieved. So, no pain, or RSI-related complications. The design is helped by its simplicity – there are no rollers to get clogged-up, or parts that need replacing – and by its comfortable shape. There are two ways to use the MouseBean: one is to use it free-floating, keeping it in place with your hand; the other is to use the connector. This is a two-part mechanism, comprising a socket that sticks to the back of the mouse, and the connector, which slides into the MouseBean’s body. When coupled, the two keep the device in one position behind the mouse. The advantages of the connector are that you’re less likely to lose the Bean, and that your wrist is subjected to less lateral movement. If, like me, however, you have mitts the size of tennis rackets, things can get uncomfortable after a while. Maybe different lengths of connector rod would allow for longer fingertip extensions – essential for fine work.


If you already have, or are at risk of developing RSI as a result of mouse use, look into using the MouseBean. It won’t chafe your wrist like conventional rests, and you’ll notice an almost immediate difference. I’ve only been using mine for a day, and I’m already hooked – but maybe that’s down to its Ann Summers qualities.

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