Safari 1.0

Apple's baby Web browser Safari is now a shiny 1.0, and has been happily embraced by the Mac fraternity around the world. Its brushed-metal appearance and speedy browsing of Web sites has received praise from many Mac users jaded by the tooth-scraping pain of Internet Explorer. Now that Microsoft has announced its intention to halt any more updates of its world-dominating browser, it's a good job Apple CEO Steve Jobs decided to build his own.

Version 1.0 of Safari doesn't appear to have any significant developments since its formative months, although the bug-reporting button on the beta release of Apple's browser Safari has disappeared - too soon, some might say. Safari may have problems with sites that don't strictly adhere to W3C Web standards.

The Google search box cannot be internationalized, for example to be set to rather than .com, which is a shame. It would also be better to be able to manage cookies directly. But Safari is definitely fast to launch, and loads complicated Web pages very smoothly.

A few of the Safari-only interface features that will improve your Web browsing experience are the bookmark management, the ad pop-up killer, the assisted form-filling options and password management using the Address Book and Mac OS X keychain. The SnapBack trail to stop you getting lost and tabbed browsing are a bonus too.

The Privacy Reset options can wipe your download and history trails, clear cache, and remove cookies, saved names and passwords. It also has decent support for languages other than English due to Jaguar's Unicode support. You'll not end up with a messy desktop when using Safari to download files either. You can set it to dump the compressed leftovers and put disk images away automatically.


It's really not worth all the hassle to not use Safari, but keep a copy of Internet Explorer for troublesome sites.

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