OK… maybe I’ve just been in this game too long and I’ve blown a sense of humour fuse. But these sort of programs just give me bad flash-backs to the early geeky days of the Mac and a whole forgettable progression of so-called “productivity” or “ideas processor” software that promised to organize your life, and maybe even your hard drive. Following in the festering footsteps of ThinkTank and other venerable to-do solutions desperately looking for a problem, Chronos LC has recently released StickyBrain 2, the latest update of its productivity applications that supposedly lets you store just about anything and, well, find anything, with one click. StickyBrain incorporates something called a “sticky note” interface – which is rather like the sticky notes most people already have on the Mac. Like the Mac stickies, it can store any type of information, including text, pictures, sounds, contacts file/application links, Web and email addresses and more. However, StickyBrain 2 has a Sticky Browser, which, Chronos claims, works like – well, a good Internet search engine. Enter a few search words and StickyBrain will immediately compile a list of matching stickies, which can be edited right in the Browser window – just like a browser. Another new feature called Text Lookup, links the Sticky Browser to other applications and lets you search for relationships between information in StickyBrain and content in other applications. It can even examine a Web page and immediately locate the user name and password for that page. StickyBrain 2 boasts one-click technology, so information can be saved with one click, and it’ll be available when you need it. The new version also offers a system-wide Contextual Menu for one-click storing and finding, and the cleverly named Sticky Slider now visually filters data. If you haven’t yet lost the will to live, StickyBrain 2 also adds security options to hide and password-protect private data, and an annoying new Critical Alarm Option offers reminders until you get fed up and switch it off. The application supports HotKeys, which are designed to make it easy to transfer information to and from other applications. So, for example, if you’re online and come across an interesting article, you can press a special key-combination, and the article will be saved as a “sticky” even if StickyBrain isn’t running.


If you’re the sort of person who is passionate about your well-ordered paper-clip collection, has a burning desire to do post-graduate work on the semiotics of to-do lists, or seriously worries about being embarrassed by your mobile phone, then you’ll love StickyBrain2. If you have a life, however, and are capable of independent, creative thought and organizing your data, give it a miss. Re-packaging stickies on steroids isn’t big and it isn’t clever. And if the world is going to be destroyed by an asteroid in under 20 years, don’t you have something better to do with your time?

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