NoteSuite 1.0 review - Note-taking app using iCloud

The Mac version of NoteSuite doesn’t have the same range of annotation tools as the iPad version, either. And, of course, the lack of an iPhone version could deter many people who – like me – are constantly tapping out notes and reminders on their iPhone.

There’s no shortage of note-taking and To-Do apps available for both the Mac and iOS devices, with Evernote currently sitting on top of that particular pile. The latest addition to that crowded category is NoteSuite, which is available for both the Mac and iPad – but not, currently, for the iPhone. 

NoteSuite isn’t the most polished note-taking app we’ve ever seen, but it does have one big advantage over rivals such as Evernote in that it uses Apple’s iCloud service to sync your notes and to-do lists across multiple devices. The basic version of Evernote is free, whereas NoteSuite costs £2.99 on the Mac and £1.49 on the iPad. However, Evernote relies on the developer’s own servers to sync information across your devices, and if you need to upload and sync more than 60Mb of data a month you have to pay for one of its premium subscription plans. 

In contrast, NoteSuite uses iCloud to simply push your notes and to-do lists directly from one device to another. Your files aren’t stored on anyone’s servers so there’s no subscription required for that service. I’ve had some problems using iCloud even with Apple’s own rather basic Notes app, so I was impressed to see that NoteSuite’s iCloud syncing worked smoothly and without problems across my office iMac, my MacBook Air and my iPad.

Beyond that, though, NoteSuite’s note-taking tools are relatively simple and straightforward. The program looks a little bit like a simple wordprocessor, with a toolbar running along the top of the main window that allows you to select font, size, colour and style. There are also two tabs at the top of the screen that allow you to switch between the notes and to-do modes.

To get started you simply click the ‘Create’ icon in that toolbar, and select either ‘note’ or ‘to-do’ from the pop-up menu that appears. You can drag and drop images into your notes, and add audio recordings to notes as well. We also like NoteSuite’s ability to ‘clip’ web pages and turn them into notes for offline reading. That’s not particularly original, but it does works well, even with long articles that run across multiple web pages.

However, importing other types of files is a little more awkward. You can attach a file, such as a Word document or PDF file, to an existing note but what actually happens here is that the file is imported as a separate note, and a link to that note is inserted into the original note. That can get messy if you need to attach multiple files to a single note.

The Mac version of NoteSuite doesn’t have the same range of annotation tools as the iPad version, either. And, of course, the lack of an iPhone version could deter many people who – like me – are constantly tapping out notes and reminders on their iPhone.

OUR VERDICT

NoteSuite is a good note-taking app, even if it can’t quite outgun rivals such as Evernote. However, its outstanding feature is the smooth iCloud syncing, which will definitely appeal to anyone that uses an iPad or multiple Macs. But most of those people will have an iPhone too, so the developers really need to release an iPhone version if they want to compete with the many similar apps that are already available for the iPhone.

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