xPad review

We’re always on the hunt for text-editing tools to replace Apple’s feeble TextEdit. Bean is good as a general word processor, while Scrivener is great for large, research-driven projects. But we still need a text editor for readme files, notes and quick coding jobs. Enter xPad.

It’s a simple text editor with very basic formatting functions. A floating font window takes care of typeface selection, sizing and weight. You can also highlight and strikethrough areas of text, which is handy for editing. Grammar and spelling tools are included, as well as search and substitution features.

xPad’s real strength is in its organisational abilities. Any document you import is added to a pop-out drawer at the side of the application. The default category for these is named Documents, but you can create new categories to make a bespoke filing system. You can even colour-code categories. This is the feature that makes xPad a viable TextEdit alternative. Use it to store and easily find snippets of code, to-do lists, research, recipes...

There are some cons to all this simplicity. Though xPad offers document word counts we had to search for it. There are no character or section counts. Also, we spent a good few minutes looking for a way to open old documents using the menu – before realising that the correct command is Import.

OUR VERDICT

xPad has replaced both TextEdit and Stickies on our system. As a free download, there’s no reason why it can’t do the same on yours.

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