WebStorm 1.0 review

The Mac doesn’t have lots of decent web authoring tools. Dreamweaver, Coda and even good old BBEdit have a place in our arsenal. Still, not many focus on project management in the way PC web applications seem to. WebStorm neatly fills that gap, offering a cross-platform site-building tool with an emphasis on the brainier side of coding.

That WebStorm started out as a Linux-based project comes as no surprise. There are few graphic frills here. WebStorm sets out to offer a powerful manual coding interface for client-side page development and does it well. With support for HTML5, CSS3 and JavaScript, you’ll have no trouble editing existing pages or creating new projects from scratch.

Projects are the paradigm here. When you create new content in WebStorm you don’t tinker with a single page, you create a new site. You can even edit existing sites, importing them from the root folder. WebStorm identifies and classifies files by type and awards them their own icon so you can find files easily. When opened in the program’s editor, feedback and hints help you to create clean, verified code.

You’re not stuck with local sites, either. WebStorm connects by FTP to your remote server so you can edit then sync pages within live sites. It even works with version control systems, for teams working on the same site.

OUR VERDICT

The only disappointment is that it doesn’t directly support PHP. To get that, you’ll have to buy the very similar PHPStorm, at £77. In either case, you’ll get industrial-strength coding features for a reasonable outlay.

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