Using Photo Effects in iPhoto for iOS

Learn how to make more from the Photo Effects available in iPhoto for the iPad and iPhone.

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The first version of iPhoto for iOS was very much the junior partner when compared to iPhoto for the Mac. However, iPhoto version 2.0 for iOS has grown up. The program’s interface has had a redesign that more closely follows the graphical style of iOS 7 itself. Version 2.0 has also gained a number of new effects.

See also: iPhoto projects

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The first version of iPhoto for iOS was very much the junior partner when compared to iPhoto for the Mac. However, iPhoto version 2.0 for iOS has grown up. The program’s interface has had a redesign that more closely follows the graphical style of iOS 7 itself. Version 2.0 has also gained a number of new effects.

See also: iPhoto projects

 

Step 2 of 10:

Select a photo you want to work with, then tap the Effects icon in the bottom toolbar. Version 2.0 of iPhoto has lost the old ‘swatch’ that was used to display effects, instead offering thumbnail previews. There are new black-and-white effects, plus a set of Drama effects. We’ll tap and select the latter.

 

Step 3 of 10:

Thumbnail previews are now displayed below the photo. If you’re new to iPhoto tap the ‘?’ icon in the top toolbar to view tool tips. Through these we learned that you can drag your finger across the thumbnails to emphasise different colours within the photo, plus how to fine-tune the effect.

 

Step 4 of 10:

By dragging our finger across the thumbnails we found that those on the right tend to boost skintones; those on the left boost other colours, such as this couple’s clothing. We boosted the skintones, but the clothing appeared washed out. By tapping and holding in a specific area we could apply fine control.

 

Step 5 of 10:

With these controls visible you can move your finger left or right across the screen to adjust the tone of the entire image. You can also adjust specific colours by tapping on a particular colour – such as the blue shirt or the sea – and then moving your finger up or down to lighten or darken that colour.

 

Step 6 of 10:

Experiment at will with iPhoto’s effects, as it’s easy to undo any changes. Use the Undo icon in the top toolbar to step back through your changes one at a time, or open the Options menu to remove all changes made with a particular effect. The top-right icon lets you compare before and after shots.

 

Step 7 of 10:

iPhoto’s effects are non-destructive, which means the original photo is preserved. It is possible to discard all the editing changes you have made and revert to the original. Tap the Browser icon at the bottom right to deactivate the editing controls, then tap on the Options menu in the righthand corner.

 

Step 8 of 10:

Most of iPhoto’s effects work in a similar fashion, allowing you to select variations on a basic effect using the thumbnail previews, then fine-tune the effect by tapping and sliding your finger on the image. However, you can only apply one effect at a time – add a second effect and the first one disappears.

 

Step 9 of 10:

The solution is rather clumsy. You must use the Share menu to send the edited photo to the Camera Roll, which saves a copy of the edited image. Since the Camera Roll is treated as a separate album in iPhoto, you can then re-open the edited image and apply a second effect.

 

Step 10 of 10:

All this copying images can be a hassle, but one timesaving option is the ability to copy the effect added to one photo and then paste it on to another image. So, if we adjust this texture effect to add a grainy border to one photo, we can then use the same effect with any other photo we choose.

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