Recently, authorities around the world have launched a series of investigations into the App Store, following harsh criticism of Apple's stewardship from companies such as Epic Games and Spotify. But Apple is not taking it lying down.

In a submission sent to the Australian Competition & Consumer Commission (ACCC), Apple has argued strenuously against the idea that the App Store is a monopoly, claiming that there are plenty of alternatives.

Apart from other app stores run by Google, Amazon, Samsung and Microsoft, Apple emphasises that developers can invest in web apps. In other words, they have virtually the entire internet at their disposal.

"Developers have - and importantly, actually use - many alternatives for getting their apps to users," Apple argues. "These alternatives span both methods of distributing apps directly to users rather than through the App Store, and methods of distributing the subscriptions, memberships and paid services that drive app revenue into users' hands regardless of platform, thereby facilitating costless distribution of the app itself on iOS devices."

Apple also points out that the fees on the App Store are not higher than in competitors' stores, and that since a few months ago, developers who earn less than a million dollars a year only need to pay a fee of 15% instead of 30%.

In consequence of these arguments, "Apple's strong view is that no market failure arises from the Apple App Store or Apple's conduct."

If the authorities nevertheless conclude that the App Store constitutes a monopoly, there may be a large fine for Apple, but the company would probably appeal against such a decision.

This article originally appeared on Macworld Sweden. Translation by David Price.