Yesterday I received a press release from a camera manufacturer who shall remain nameless. They sent the press release by post! Seriously, in this age where the only mail anyone gets is junk, or bills, there is a camera manufacturer who is still photocopying press releases and popping them into envelopes.

Now, if the company was also emailing me the press releases I might have forgiven them this slip back into the 1990s, but quite frankly, it winds me up, and having been a PR myself, PRs who get it so very wrong, really do wind me up…

There are the agencies that tell you that a camcorder works with a Mac: “Of course it does”. Then they take a month to get it to you (because they couldn’t get the previous journalist who was looking at it to give it up), which means that the feature you’ve planned has to move back a month. And then when you finally receive it, guess what? It doesn’t work with a Mac… Annoying… It happens a lot.

But I know the limitations PRs have to work under. A company pays them not much money to PR what is often a not very exciting product. Not much money because PR is very undervalued in the world of marketing, and this not much money means that the PRs end up over-servicing the account because it’s the only way they can get the results and keep the client.

I think that rather than wasting time hounding journalists to review a product so that they can tick of one of the promised 20 pieces of coverage, the time might be better spent evaluating the industry, and advising the client that they should position the product thus, to maximise their chances of getting 10 pieces of coverage that are actually possible. Oh yes, and either not wasting Mac journalist's time with products that won’t work – or telling their client to work on the Mac driver for the product and not ignore this growing market that has money to spend…

But what do I know?